Leadership and innovation

>> Thursday, October 29, 2009

A good lesson about vision and leadership and their importance for innovation.


"You cannot expect your team to be innovative if they do not know the direction in which they are headed. Innovation must have a purpose. It is up to the leader to set the course and give a bearing for the future.
(...)
You must paint a vision that is desirable, challenging and believable. If you can do this then there are three big gains for the organization"


Developing an Innovation Vision
By Paul Sloane, Blogging Innovation


Full Story

Read more...

Innovation is also about business development

>> Friday, October 23, 2009

Worth reading. As the author remind us, Gary Hamel points out that few companies are innovating around business models, where long term competitive advantage can be achieved.
R&D and Innovation should never be just product or technology development. Business and corporate development must also be a spotlight for R&D.


"Something happens when you put on a lab coat and safety glasses. You have the immediate ability to explore concepts and ideas that may, or may not, become new products. And your time horizon shifts dramatically. Many people in primary R&D are examining technologies or molecules that won't become products for many years.
The question we as innovators should ask ourselves, and our companies, is: why is this kind of thinking and investment committed solely in technology R&D? Why, in a pharmaceutical company, is there a team that is actively investigating new compounds and molecules that may become new drugs, but no one that is actively investigating new business strategies, new organizational hierarchies, new management philosophies? Why is innovation confined to the "R&D" wing of the business, and walled off from all the other things we do to add value to a business?"


R&D for the rest of us
By Jeffrey Phillips, Innovate on Purpose


Full Story

Read more...

Positive environment for innovation

Very interesting analysis about creativity, risk taking and how to avoid failure to block innovation and progress. Worth reading.


"Thomas Alva Edison was a failure. It has been said that he "went back to the drawing board" more than 6,000 times before finding the right plant to produce a carbonized filament for his incandescent light bulb.
Six thousand times. Do you have that kind of innovative stamina?
(...)
Innovation is an experiment of sorts. It requires a culture of risk, opportunity and challenge. Moreover, for an organization to benefit from innovation, leaders and team members alike must welcome - and grow from - failure.
Rather than view failure as inherently bad, successful innovation requires that executives and teams commit to learning from each experiment gone bad - and incorporate those teachings into the next endeavor.
(...)
Most of all, avoid letting a failed concept kill your team's motivation. Every idea should be given positive acknowledgment, every failure should be studied for "what went wrong," and every success should receive appropriate reward. By providing your team with a culture of Innovation, their risk-taking abilities will improve. And, as was the case with Mr. Edison, they eventually will see the light borne from their successful innovations."


Creating an Improved Environment for Innovation
By Robert F. Brands, Blogging Innovation


Full Story

Read more...

Why to start a business?

10 good reasons to start a business. Who wants to identify 10 more?


"With the right planning, effort and a little bit of luck, 2009 could be a great year to start up a business. But why would you want to go it alone in the first place? Here, Startups.co.uk gives you 10 great reasons why you should start up over the coming year."


10 reasons to start a business
By startups.co.uk


Full Story

Read more...

Core Customers: Help them and they will help you

>> Thursday, October 22, 2009

Good article about the value, now more than ever, of your current customers and how might them help you getting new clients.


"Regardless of where you fit on the spectrum of pessimist and optimist, you have to agree that business will never be the same as it was in the past. Too much has changed, and nothing more so than the awareness that entrepreneurs cannot take the future of their business or their current customers for granted.
(...)
Keep looking for new opportunities to support each customer. You may be surprised how often such opportunities arise when a client sees that you are helping his business. Your client will want to do more business with you and will happily recommend your services to others."


Focus on Core Customers
By Tamara Monosoff, Entrepreneur


Full Story

Read more...

Email marketing

>> Wednesday, October 21, 2009

A good introduction to Email Marketing.


"(...) the key to successful email marketing is the development of a legitimate trust relationship with your subscribers. If you opt to send your subscribers a request for purchases every single day, they will likely tire of your badgering and cease reading your emails altogether."


Getting Started In Internet Marketing
By Internet Marketing is Nuts!


Full Story

Read more...

How do you feel about devil?

>> Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Very good, love this post. Brilliant story about one of the main challenges for all companies.


"I've been reading a new book that describes some of the trials and tribulations of innovative types in non-innovative companies. One of the points the author makes is that innovative types have to work with the "tried and true" people who want six decimal place proof of everything. Clearly for most innovative concepts that's nearly impossible. Another point is made that ultimately, the only way to create something compelling and new is to radically understand the customer or user. This, naturally, lead me to the concept of empathy for the user, which led me, in some dark workings of my mind, to Empathy for the devil, since most of us consider customers or users as particularly distasteful people we have to deal with because they purchased our products or services, rather than the drivers and predictors of the next big things."


Empathy for the devil
By Jeffrey Phillips, Innovate on Purpose


Full Story

Read more...

Again, what's your story?

Another good article about the importance of a good story, not just a good product or brand.


"Brilliant's not enough in today's economy--you need a compelling story so people will remember you."


Does Your Brand Tell a Powerful Story?
By Mary van de Wiel, Entrepreneur


Full Story

Read more...

Lessons for life

Really worth reading. A lot of good advices - the author say they are good for your business but they are unquestionably good for your life. Everyone should read.


"We get so caught up in the daily life of running a business, it’s easy to miss the forest for the trees.
Not that you have a choice! You’re fighting fires, handling a pissed-off customer, rending your face over an emergency bug-fix, the website just went down, and the accountant is coming tomorrow and the books are in shambles.
All normal. But still every month or so it’s nice to take a step back and see whether you’re missing a chance to make a more meaningful change to your business."


How to Work ON Your Business, Not IN it
By Jason Cohen, Small Business Trends


Full Story

Read more...

Intrapreneurship for small business

>> Friday, October 16, 2009

So far so good. Key points of what will be a presentation about innovation and intrapreneurship on small and medium-sized companies. Worth reading.


"Any company must ask themselves why open innovation is relevant to them, how it should be defined to their situation, how it links with the overall strategy and how it can be implemented. Smaller companies must also prepare the organization for a cultural change, develop and implement a networking strategy and train their employees on innovation, stakeholder management and how to work with external partners."


Intrapreneurship and Open Innovation for Small Business
By Stefan Lindegaard, Blogging Innovation


Full Story

Read more...

A red flag to avoid

Very good. Do you know what you are doing?


"When you’re an early-stage startup that hasn’t raised any institutional money you end up doing almost every job function of the company yourself.  But some companies have entrepreneurs that seem talented on paper, are in a space that seems interesting to investors and are able to raise venture capital early in the company’s existence.  This can often happen when there is a good product built but no real customer adoption yet.  This is what happened to me.
(...)
One the one hand I feel great because we went out and built software that solved an industry problem.  Many companies in this era literally handed over $3-4 million to Ariba or CommerceOne and set up “exchanges.” 
On the other hand, I had never had to do the detailed work to get an intuitive feel for what customers wanted or how to train and service them.  I taught me an important lesson: it’s very hard to run a burger chain if you’ve never flipped burgers yourself."


Startup Founders Should Flip Burgers
By Mark Suster, Both Sides of the Table


Full Story

Read more...

Innovation: Far beyond ideas

>> Thursday, October 15, 2009

Wise advice. A good story is, at least, as important as a good idea.
Without a story, what do you have to sell?


"Generating good research and developing good ideas is only half the battle (and arguably the easy part). If you want to be successful you need to develop a good, sticky story. This will enable you to sell the findings and ideas both vertically and horizontally. As you know, it’s imperative to sell the ideas to your management, your client and eventually to consumers."


Want to be a successful innovator? Here’s some advice that just might save your life.
By BSM, MD Innovation Engine Blog


Full Story

Read more...

Saving money with technology

>> Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Some good advices on how to save money with technology.


"Recently we asked you to contribute your best real-world tips and advice for how small businesses like yours can save money by using technology, or how to save money on technology purchases."


51 Tips For Saving Money On Technology
By Anita Campbell, Small Business Trends


Full Story

Read more...

How to stimulate word of mouth

Worth reading. Assuming you have a good product, in this post you'll find 5 good ways to get your customers talking about you.


"Word of mouth marketing is considered by many to be the most desired form of marketing. The trust, referrals, and overall brand building buzz that’s garnered by customers spreading the good word to prospects is worth its weight in gold. Some products, services, and experiences naturally produce chatter, but there are certainly things that any company can do to stimulate word of mouth and cash in on the buzz.
(...)
Bottom line of course is that you’ve got to do good work, do something that somebody appreciates, and create an experience worth talking about, but then, prime the pump and leverage all that greatness."


5 Ways to Get Your Customers Talking
By John Jantsch, Duct Tape Marketing


Full Story

Read more...

Accountability as a routine

5 good ways to increase accountability.


"As business owners with 42 things to do to get through the daily grind, not to mention long-term business goals to pursue, most of us are constantly seeking new ways to create accountability – to drag ourselves (kicking and screaming, if necessary) to the finish line.
Here’s five ways to build accountability into your daily routine"


5 Tips for Creating More Accountability
By J.K. Glei, American Express Open Forum


Full Story

Read more...

Identifying innovators

>> Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Questions to ask to build a successful innovation team.


"The point here is that most organizations actively work against many of the attributes that would define good innovators.
So, if you are seeking to build an innovation team, or hire people with a greater proclivity for innovation, perhaps you should ask the following questions:"


Identifying the Innovators in your Firm
By Jeffrey Phillips, Blogging Innovation


Full Story

Read more...

Tips for survival

Very good advice. Don’t forget to look at the final recommendation.


"Every startup mentor has his favorite list of basic strategies to avoid pitfalls, and I’m no exception. If my experience and insights can save just one founder from the stress, lost time, and lost money associated with a startup misstep, then I’m a happy man. I offer these pragmatic recommendations:"


Seven Steps to Startup Survival
By Marty Zwilling, Startup Professionals Musings


Full Story

Read more...

How to start today!

Very good, worth reading. Three action items to start a business right now.
   
"So you want to become an entrepreneur. But where do you start? You don’t have a big idea that’s going to change the world, you don’t have partners to found your company with, and you don’t know how to even start pitching for funding.
(...)
The chance of starting your huge business as a freelancer or consultant, then building your business one additional employee at a time, is quite high. In fact, it’s the way almost every business is built (aside from the start-ups, who artificially inflate their cash flow to gain market share quickly, because they are building disruptive technology).
So even if you have a full-time job right now, you can venture into entrepreneurship part-time, until you have enough steady business to match the suggested 50% of current income. The internet makes it easier than ever before."


Start up your business today
By Monica O'Brien


Full Story

Read more...

How to build your business

A compilation of some good advices on how to build a company and not to become slave to it.


"If there is one thing that I hear over and over from entrepreneurs, it is that they are struggling to scale their businesses. They say that they have become a slave to their own company, and are struggling to break free. With that in mind, I reached out to the TPE community, and here are the tips they shared on how to stop working in the business and start working on the business:"


How To Build Your Business, And Not Become A Slave To It
By Mike Michalowicz, The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur


Full Story

Read more...

Who to partner with

Good advice from Marty Zwilling. Key aspects to think when considering a partner to start a business.


"Most entrepreneurs who start a company alone soon come to the conclusion that two heads are better than one – someone to share the workload, the hard decisions, and the costs.
(...)
Or you might start the partner search by looking for someone just like you, who is creative, and with your passion for the fast-paced, multi-tasking atmosphere of a startup. That could also be a big mistake, since you really need a partner who is complementary, and can tackle the operational roles, like marketing, finance, and sales.
If you think about it, you should realize that not everyone is ‘ideal partner material.’ "


Attributes of an Ideal Startup Partner
By Marty Zwilling, Startup Professionals Musings


Full Story

Read more...

  © Blogger template Simple n' Sweet by Ourblogtemplates.com 2009

Back to TOP